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Chinese 103: Elementary Chinese I: Find Books

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Use the library catalog to identify and locate books, video, audio and other material in our library. It is often best to begin with a detailed keyword search. Once you have identified an item that is within the scope of your research, use the subject headings found in the record describing it to locate similar materials. Also, when you retrieve a book from the shelf, you may wish to peruse the books shelved near it as they are likely to be on the same, or a related, subject.

Use WorldCat to identify materials held by other libraries around the world. Most of these you will need to request via interlibrary loan should you wish to use them. ILLiad, our interlibrary loan system, is linked below. Please feel free to use the interlirbary loan service, but be sure you have planned for the time it will take for books to be shipped here. Articles are usually delivered electronically and, therefore, much quicker.

Google Book Search offers certain advantages such as the ability to search the full-text of works as well as the ability to view the text of works that are no longer restricted by copyright. If you find something in Google Books that appears to be useful for your research, but you cannot view the book, be sure to check to see if the book is in our library. If not, you can place an interlibrary loan request.

New Chinese Books in the Library!

Public Discourses of Contemporary China

Exploring contemporary Chinese literature, film, and television, Yipeng Shen sheds light on the historical significance of nationalism for mass imagination and identification in the less-than-democratic system of China for the past three decades. Analyzing cultural products from a wide range of media, chapters move from the intellectual idealism of the 1980s, through the post-Tiananmen transition, to the national cinema of the 1990s, and finally to the Internet literature of today. Public Discourses of Contemporary China argues that Chinese subjects have, to varying degrees, transformed the state project of modernization into their own through mass aestheticization of the nation.

The Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature

The Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature features more than fifty short essays on specific writers and literary trends from the Qing period (1895-1911) to the present. The volume opens with thematic essays on the politics and ethics of writing literary history, the formation of the canon, the relationship between language and form, the role of literary institutions and communities, the effects of censorship, the representation of the Chinese diaspora, the rise and meaning of Sinophone literature, and the role of different media in the development of literature. Subsequent essays focus on authors, their works, and the schools with which they were aligned, featuring key names, titles, and terms in English and in Chinese characters. Woven throughout are pieces on late Qing fiction, popular entertainment fiction, martial arts fiction, experimental theater, post-Mao avant-garde poetry, post-martial law fiction from Taiwan, contemporary genre fiction from China, and recent Internet literature. The volume includes essays on such authors as Liang Qichao, Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Eileen Chang, Jin Yong, Mo Yan, Wang Anyi, Gao Xingjian, and Yan Lianke. Both a teaching tool and a go-to research companion, this volume is a one-of-a-kind resource for mastering modern literature in the Chinese-speaking world.

Red Revolution, Green Revolution

In 1968, the director of USAID coined the term "green revolution" to celebrate the new technological solutions that promised to ease hunger around the world--and forestall the spread of more "red," or socialist, revolutions. Yet in China, where modernization and scientific progress could not be divorced from politics, green and red revolutions proceeded side by side.             In Red Revolution, Green Revolution, Sigrid Schmalzer explores the intersection of politics and agriculture in socialist China through the diverse experiences of scientists, peasants, state agents, and "educated youth." The environmental costs of chemical-intensive agriculture and the human costs of emphasizing increasing production over equitable distribution of food and labor have been felt as strongly in China as anywhere--and yet, as Schmalzer shows, Mao-era challenges to technocracy laid important groundwork for today's sustainability and food justice movements. This history of "scientific farming" in China offers us a unique opportunity not only to explore the consequences of modern agricultural technologies but also to engage in a necessary rethinking of fundamental assumptions about science and society.

Red Legacies in China

What has contemporary China inherited from its revolutionary past? How do the realities and memories, aesthetics and practices of the Mao era still reverberate in the post-Mao cultural landscape? The essays in this volume propose red legacies as a new critical framework from which to examine the profusion of cultural productions and afterlives of the communist revolution in order to understand Chinaâe(tm)s continuities and transformations from socialism to postsocialism. Organized into five partsâe"red foundations, red icons, red classics, red bodies, and red shadowsâe"the bookâe(tm)s interdisciplinary contributions focus on visual and performing arts, literature and film, language and thought, architecture, museums, and memorials. Mediating at once unfulfilled ideals and unmourned ghosts across generations, red cultural legacies suggest both inheritance and debt, and can be mobilized to support as well as to critique the status quo.

Homesickness

The collapse of Chinaâe(tm)s Qing dynasty coincided roughly with discoveries that helped revolutionize views of infectious disease. Together, these parallel developments generated a set of paradigm shifts in the understanding of society, the individual, as well as the cultural matrix that mediates between them. In Homesickness, Carlos Rojas examines an array of Chinese literary and cinematic tropes of illness, arguing that these works approach sickness not solely as a symptom of dysfunction but more importantly as a key to its potential solution. Rojas focuses on a condition he calls âeoehomesicknessâeâe"referring to a discomfort caused not by a longing for home but by an excessive proximity to it. The product of a dialectics of internal alienation and self-differentiation, this inverse homesickness marks a movement away from the âeoehome,âe conceived as spaces associated with the nation, the family, and the individual body. The result is a productive dynamism that gives rise to the possibility of long-term health. Without sickness, in other words, there could be no health. Through a set of detailed analyses of works from China, Greater China, and the global Chinese diasporaâe"ranging from late-imperial figures such as Liu E and Zeng Pu to contemporary figures such as Yan Lianke and Tsai Ming-liangâe"Rojas asserts that the very possibility of health is predicated on this condition of homesickness.

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