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Computer Science 284: Database Design with Web Applications: Find Books

A guide to basic information resources on Database Design with Web Applications, Computer Science 284.

Locating Books in the Library

Below is a very general outline of the major Library of Congress Classification areas in which materials in computer science and related areas can be found. Most of these materials will be located on the main floor of the library. Using the library catalog is best to pinpoint materials; however, the areas listed below can also help guide you to areas in which you can browse for materials.

QA1-939 Mathematics

QA1-43 General

QA47-59 Tables

QA71-90 Instruments and machines

QA75-76.95 Calculating machines

QA75.5-76.95 Electronic computers. Computer science

QA76.75-76.765 Computer software

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Books on Computer Science in the Library

Quantum Computing since Democritus

Written by noted quantum computing theorist Scott Aaronson, this book takes readers on a tour through some of the deepest ideas of maths, computer science and physics. Full of insights, arguments and philosophical perspectives, the book covers an amazing array of topics. Beginning in antiquity with Democritus, it progresses through logic and set theory, computability and complexity theory, quantum computing, cryptography, the information content of quantum states and the interpretation of quantum mechanics. There are also extended discussions about time travel, Newcomb's Paradox, the anthropic principle and the views of Roger Penrose. Aaronson's informal style makes this fascinating book accessible to readers with scientific backgrounds, as well as students and researchers working in physics, computer science, mathematics and philosophy.

Ubiquitous Computing in Education

Digital technology has radically altered the way in which we live and work, but has not had a substantial impact on education. "Ubiquitous Computing in Education" explores the educational potential of ubiquitous computing initiatives that make digital tools available to students and teachers. Combining theory, research, and practice, this volume paints a broad picture of the field of ubiquitous computing in education, which focuses on the availability of digital tools for teachers and students to use anywhere and anytime to support teaching and learning. The book illustrates how to use theory and research to enhance technology integration, teaching practices, and student achievement. The significance of ubiquitous computing for teaching and learning is highlighted, as the text discusses why it is important, what it looks like, what the research tells us about it, and how ubiquitous computing can work in different types of learning environments today and in years to come. This book is of interest to researchers and graduate students in educational technology, as well as teachers, administrators, policymakers, and industry leaders who can use the text to make essential decisions related to their respective roles in education.

Computing

The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

A Balanced Introduction to Computer Science

A Balanced Introduction to Computer Science, 3/e is ideal for Introduction to Computing and the Web courses in departments of Math and Computer Science. This thoughtfully written text uses the Internet as a central theme, studying its history, technology, and current use. Experimental problems use Web-based tools, enabling students to learn programming fundamentals by developing their own interactive Web pages with HTML and JavaScript. Integrating breadth-based and depth-based chapters, Reed covers a broad range of topics balanced with programming depth in a hands-on, tutorial style.

Computer Science Reconsidered

The Invocation Model of Process Expression argues that mathematics does not provide the most appropriate conceptual foundations for computer science, but, rather, that these foundations are a primary source of unnecessary complexity and confusion.  It supports that there is a more appropriate conceptual model that unifies forms of expression considered quite disparate and simplifies issues considered complex and intractable.  This book presents that this model of process expression is alternative theory of computer science that is both valid and practical.

Computer Science Majors

Answers the question, What can I do with a major in . . . ? Students can explore their career options within their field of study using the Great Jobs series as their guide. From assessing individual talents and skills to taking the necessary steps to land a job, every aspect of identifying and getting started in a career choice is covered. Readers learn to explore their options, target an ideal career, present a major as an asset to a job, perfect a job search, and follow through and get results.

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