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Jessie Ball duPont Library

Alumni Publications

The Library provides information on alumni authored books and other materials as a service to our alumni community. To browse titles by fellow alumni, search alphabetically by last name or by class year.

Recent Alumni Publications

An Intimate Good by Laurel Mathewson, T'2013.

At age twenty-one, the pain of losing her mother to cancer sent Laurel Mathewson--with a naturally skeptical and questioning outlook--on a years-long existential journey. After an unexpected, overwhelming experience of God's love, Laurel felt God say to her, "Turn to Teresa. She will guide you." She understood that "Teresa" was the sixteenth-century saint Teresa of Avila, but she knew very little about her. Even after becoming an Episcopal priest, she had never read more than a few pages of Teresa's writings. Laurel began to read The Interior Castle, Teresa's book about the "dwellings" within our souls that we move through to develop an ever-deepening relationship with God through prayer. She truly marveled at discovering a text that illuminated her own spiritual path with such insight, candor, and clarity. And she continued to experience the intimate presence of a God who kept defying and transforming her cynical nature--and offered her the gift of healing. This beautifully written and moving memoir illustrates an ancient reality still very much alive today: the love and closeness of a good God, as known through Jesus Christ, who seeks to move out into the world, into our very bodies and lives. Not by nature or training inclined to believe such a wild claim, Laurel discovered that God is full of surprises. In every age, but perhaps particularly in our own, people hunger for personal narratives that help bring to life complex frameworks and ideas. An Intimate Good brings into focus not just Teresa's Interior Castle but also the living God who is at the heart of it, especially for modern readers who take the life of the mind seriously and yearn for confirmation of meaning and belovedness. Laurel's journey will lead you to a clearer understanding of the varied avenues God works in our lives over time, through prayer and other people, leading us in ways only possible by One who knows us intimately and loves us deeply.  

Walk the Dark Hills by Joe Nunley, T'1986.

An historical adventure set in 1891-1892. Cade Schild, wrongly convicted of a crime, is sent to Tracy City where he must survive the dangers of a coal mine, a sadistic guard, and life among convicts where brutal beatings and death are common events. Unexpectedly, he is transferred to the coal baron's estate to maintain his grounds and stables where he meets Lacey Jennings. A romantic relationship is forbidden, but their attraction is irresistible. They fall in love amid a crumbling social structure that can no longer sustain itself.

Yes Gawd! by Royal G. Cravens, III, C'2010.

Yes Gawd! explores the effects of religious belief and practice on political behavior among the LGBT community, a population long persecuted by religious institutions and generally considered to be non-religious. Royal Cravens deftly shows how faith impacts the politics of LGBT people. He details how the queer community creates, defines, and experiences spirituality and spiritual affirmation as well as the consequences this has for their identity, socialization, and political development. Cravens also demonstrates the mobilizing power of faith for LGBT people by contrasting the effects of participation in faith and secular communities on political activism. He explores how factors such as coming out, race, and LGBT-affirming churches influence political attitudes and behavior and explains how the development of LGBT politico-religious activism provides opportunities for LGBT people to organize politically. Ultimately, Cravens provides a cohesive account of how religion acts as a catalyst for and facilitator in the political development of LGBT people in the United States. In the process, he shows that there is room for both religion in LGBT communities and LGBT people in religious communities.

Pilgrims 2.0 by Lindsey Harding, L'2011.

A novel following four passengers on a luxury cruise line that promises complete reinvention through plastic surgery. PILGRIM, Canterbury Cruise Line's flagship, promises its passengers not just a luxurious fortnight away but the opportunity for reinvention. This extraordinary journey is made possible by the captain and visionary plastic surgeon Dr. Walter Heston, by the vessel's self-learning artificial intelligence called BECCA, and an all-male crew of room stewards, deck hands, technicians, and cosmetic practitioners. Pilgrims 2.0 begins on the eve of Cruise #52 and follows four women eager for transformation. Meet Bianca, the aging athlete determined to resume the competitive tennis career that motherhood sidelined. Meet Nicole, whose mommy makeover will mean she can stop hiding herself, and her debt, from her husband. Meet Lyla, an infertile maternity-ward nurse desperate to experience pregnancy, and Annalie, who wants only to stop seeing her dead twin every time she looks in the mirror. At the center of the story is Dr. Heston himself, driven to do with bodies what his late wife, Rebecca, could do with computer code--make the impossible, possible. But "excursions" like these aren't always smooth sailing--especially on this voyage, where the hopes, histories, and obsessions of clients and crew members collide. When a disruptive crewman's pranks turn dangerous, it becomes clear that some of those who embarked won't return to the Port of Los Angeles--at least not fully, at least not as themselves, and maybe not with their lives.

Dusk by Boy Named Banjo: Barton Davies, C'2016.; William Reames, C'2016.

Boy Named Banjo - "Dusk"Boy Named / Banjo's debut album, Dusk, is an electrifying dose of lightning in a bottle that explores the full sonic and emotional spectrum of the band's rich, eclectic sound. From late-night, feel-good, fall-in-love party anthems to stripped-down, introspective meditations on longing, hope and heartbreak, the Nashville five-piece's performances are nothing short of exhilarating - blurring the lines between Music Row and Laurel Canyon with lush harmonies and bold, cinematic arrangements. Dusk features 9 tracks including the singles "Whiskey Dreams" and "Heart Attack."

Alumni Publication.Titled, The Comfort of Crows by Margaret Renkl, H'2023.

The Comfort of Crows by Margaret Renkl, H'2023.

From the beloved New York Times opinion writer and bestselling author of Late Migrations comes a "howling love letter to the world" (Ann Patchett): a luminous book that traces the passing of seasons, personal and natural. In The Comfort of Crows, Margaret Renkl presents a literary devotional: fifty-two chapters that follow the creatures and plants in her backyard over the course of a year. As we move through the seasons--from a crow spied on New Year's Day, its resourcefulness and sense of community setting a theme for the year, to the lingering bluebirds of December, revisiting the nest box they used in spring--what develops is a portrait of joy and grief: joy in the ongoing pleasures of the natural world, and grief over winters that end too soon and songbirds that grow fewer and fewer. Along the way, we also glimpse the changing rhythms of a human life. Grown children, unexpectedly home during the pandemic, prepare to depart once more. Birdsong and night-blooming flowers evoke generations past. The city and the country where Renkl raised her family transform a little more with each passing day. And the natural world, now in visible flux, requires every ounce of hope and commitment from the author--and from us. For, as Renkl writes, "radiant things are bursting forth in the darkest places, in the smallest nooks and deepest cracks of the hidden world." With fifty-two original color artworks by the author's brother, Billy Renkl, The Comfort of Crows is a lovely and deeply moving book from a cherished observer of the natural world.

Hidden in Plain Sight by Rachel Stephens, C'2002.

In the decades leading up to the Civil War, abolitionists crafted a variety of visual messages about the plight of enslaved people, portraying the violence, familial separation, and dehumanization that they faced. In response, proslavery southerners attempted to counter these messages either through idealization or outright erasure of enslaved life.   In Hidden in Plain Sight: Concealing Enslavement in American Visual Culture, Rachel Stephens addresses an enormous body of material by tracing themes of concealment and silence through paintings, photographs, and ephemera, connecting long overlooked artworks with both the abolitionist materials to which they were responding and archival research across a range of southern historical narratives.   Stephens begins her fascinating study with an examination of the ways that slavery was visually idealized and defended in antebellum art. She then explores the tyranny--especially that depicted in art--enacted by supporters of enslavement, introduces a range of ways that artwork depicting slavery was tangibly concealed, considers photographs of enslaved female caretakers with the white children they reared, and investigates a printmaker's confidential work in support of the Confederacy. Finally, she delves into an especially pernicious group of proslavery artists in Richmond, Virginia.   Reading visual culture as a key element of the antebellum battle over slavery, Hidden in Plain Sight complicates the existing narratives of American art and history.  

Swing: New Writing That Moves You by Leigh Anne Couch, C'1990.

Nashville is a town of vagabonds and roots, a destination and a homeplace for generations. The act of creation thrums beneath the skin of this city: at any moment, you know a great song is being written or performed, a poem discovered, a story set free-- “Every morning a new arrival.” Swing wants to be the home for the emerging writer to the renowned, from the discovered to the too-long neglected. We are looking to build a print magazine with the energy and verve of its home city, where new influences course through the old. We are imagining a collection of literary works both regional and far reaching that embraces contradiction and complication. We like the idea of a magazine lightly built with high ceilings—a space for difference and dialogue. In the same way that a poem can be reborn the second it is read aloud, filling the air with sound, readers of Swing will thrill by the way an essay can flicker with new possibilities alongside a well-selected poem. Suddenly monologue becomes a dialogue, friction becomes ignition. If it’s starting to sound like I’m describing a good house party, you’re getting the idea.

 

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Poetry Unbound: 50 Poems to Open Your World by Pádraig Ó Tuama; Natasha D. Trethewey, H'2023.(Contributor)

In the tumult of our contemporary moment, poetry has emerged as an inviting, consoling outlet with a unique power to move and connect us, to inspire fury, tears, joy, laughter, and surprise. This generous anthology pairs fifty illuminating poems with poet and podcast host Pádraig Ó Tuama's appealing, unhurried reflections. With keen insight and warm personal anecdotes, Ó Tuama considers each poem's artistry and explores how its meaning can reach into our own lives. Focusing mainly on poets writing today, Ó Tuama engages with a diverse array of voices that includes Ada Limón, Ilya Kaminsky, Margaret Atwood, Ocean Vuong, Layli Long Soldier, and Reginald Dwayne Betts. Natasha Trethewey meditates on miscegenation and Mississippi; Raymond Antrobus makes poetry out of the questions shot at him by an immigration officer; Martín Espada mourns his father; Marie Howe remembers and blesses her mother's body; Aimee Nezhukumatathil offers comfort to her child-self. Through these wide-ranging poems, Ó Tuama guides us on an inspiring journey to reckon with self-acceptance, history, independence, parenthood, identity, joy, and resilience. For anyone who has wanted to try their hand at a conversation with poetry but doesn't know where to start, Poetry Unbound presents a window through which to celebrate the art of being alive.

Pentecost by Emilio Alvarez; Esau McCaulley, C'2002.(Editor)

"The power of Pentecost is inseparable from the good news of the Christ who is proclaimed in the Gospels, in accordance with the Scriptures." Pentecost may well be the most misconstrued day on the church calendar. A long legacy of cessationism has drained Pentecost of much of its significance, and it's largely misunderstood in many Western churches today, if not outright ignored. That's not the case in Emilio Alvarez's tradition, though. In this Fullness of Time volume, the Pentecostal bishop and theologian offers us a rich biblical and theological introduction to the day of Pentecost and sets it in its liturgical context--not only in the Protestant tradition but also in Catholic, Orthodox, and Pentecostal expressions. The result is a rich theological feast and an invitation to find afresh the power of the gospel for all peoples. Each volume in the Fullness of Time series invites readers to engage with the riches of the church year, exploring the traditions, prayers, Scriptures, and rituals of the seasons of the church calendar.

All shall be well : poems for Julian of Norwich by Sarah Law (Editor); Jennifer Davis Michael, C'1989. (Contributor)

To celebrate the 650th anniversary of Julian of Norwich's visionary 'Shewings', here is an anthology of new poems for Mother Julian, medieval mystic, anchoress, and the first woman to write a book in English. Lyrical, prayerful, vivid and insightful, these poems offer a poetic testament to Julian's enduring legacy of prayer and confidence in a merciful God who assured her that 'All Shall Be Well, and All Shall Be Well, and All Manner of Thing Shall Be Well.To celebrate the 650th anniversary of Julian of Norwich's visionary 'Shewings', here is an anthology of new poems for Mother Julian, medieval mystic, anchoress, and the first woman to write a book in English. Lyrical, prayerful, vivid and insightful, these poems offer a poetic testament to Julian's enduring legacy of prayer and confidence in a merciful God who assured her that 'All Shall Be Well, and All Shall Be Well, and All Manner of Thing Shall Be Well.'

How far to the promised land: One black family's story of hope and survival in the american south by Esau McCaulley, C'2002.

AMAZON'S Best Book of the Year 2023

From the New York Times contributing opinion writer and award-winning author of Reading While Black, a riveting intergenerational account of his family's search for home and hope "A riveting book that invites you into the personal journey of one of the finest writers alive today."--Beth Moore, New York Times bestselling author of All My Knotted-Up Life For much of his life, Esau McCaulley was taught to see himself as an exception: someone who, through hard work, faith, and determination, overcame childhood poverty, anti-Black racism, and an absent father to earn a job as a university professor and a life in the middle class.   But that narrative was called into question one night, when McCaulley answered the phone and learned that his father--whose absence defined his upbringing--died in a car crash. McCaulley was being asked to deliver his father's eulogy, to make sense of his complicated legacy in a country that only accepts Black men on the condition that they are exceptional, hardworking, perfect.     The resulting effort sent McCaulley back through his family history, seeking to understand the community that shaped him. In these pages, we meet his great-grandmother Sophia, a tenant farmer born with the gift of prophecy who scraped together a life in Jim Crow Alabama; his mother, Laurie, who raised four kids alone in an era when single Black mothers were demonized as "welfare queens"; and a cast of family, friends, and neighbors who won small victories in a world built to swallow Black lives. With profound honesty and compassion, he raises questions that implicate us all: What does each person's struggle to build a life teach us about what we owe each other? About what it means to be human?    How Far to the Promised Land is a thrilling and tender epic about being Black in America. It's a book that questions our too-simple narratives about poverty and upward mobility; a book in which the people normally written out of the American Dream are given voice.

How far to the promised land: One black family's story of hope and survival in the american south by Esau McCaulley, C'2002.

AMAZON'S Best Book of the Year 2023

From the New York Times contributing opinion writer and award-winning author of Reading While Black, a riveting intergenerational account of his family’s search for home and hope “A riveting book that invites you into the personal journey of one of the finest writers alive today.”—Beth Moore, New York Times bestselling author of All My Knotted-Up Life For much of his life, Esau McCaulley was taught to see himself as an exception: someone who, through hard work, faith, and determination, overcame childhood poverty, anti-Black racism, and an absent father to earn a job as a university professor and a life in the middle class. But that narrative was called into question one night, when McCaulley answered the phone and learned that his father—whose absence defined his upbringing—died in a car crash. McCaulley was being asked to deliver his father’s eulogy, to make sense of his complicated legacy in a country that only accepts Black men on the condition that they are exceptional, hardworking, perfect. The resulting effort sent McCaulley back through his family history, seeking to understand the community that shaped him. In these pages, we meet his great-grandmother Sophia, a tenant farmer born with the gift of prophecy who scraped together a life in Jim Crow Alabama; his mother, Laurie, who raised four kids alone in an era when single Black mothers were demonized as “welfare queens”; and a cast of family, friends, and neighbors who won small victories in a world built to swallow Black lives. With profound honesty and compassion, he raises questions that implicate us all: What does each person’s struggle to build a life teach us about what we owe each other? About what it means to be human? How Far to the Promised Land is a thrilling and tender epic about being Black in America. It’s a book that questions our too-simple narratives about poverty and upward mobility; a book in which the people normally written out of the American Dream are given voice.

How far to the promised land: One black family's story of hope and survival in the american south by Esau McCaulley, C'2002.

AMAZON'S Best Book of the Year 2023

Narrator: Esau McCaulley.
From the New York Times contributing opinion writer and award-winning author of Reading While Black, a riveting intergenerational account of his family’s search for home and hope “A riveting book that invites you into the personal journey of one of the finest writers alive today.”—Beth Moore, New York Times bestselling author of All My Knotted-Up Life For much of his life, Esau McCaulley was taught to see himself as an exception: someone who, through hard work, faith, and determination, overcame childhood poverty, anti-Black racism, and an absent father to earn a job as a university professor and a life in the middle class. But that narrative was called into question one night, when McCaulley answered the phone and learned that his father—whose absence defined his upbringing—died in a car crash. McCaulley was being asked to deliver his father’s eulogy, to make sense of his complicated legacy in a country that only accepts Black men on the condition that they are exceptional, hardworking, perfect. The resulting effort sent McCaulley back through his family history, seeking to understand the community that shaped him. In these pages, we meet his great-grandmother Sophia, a tenant farmer born with the gift of prophecy who scraped together a life in Jim Crow Alabama; his mother, Laurie, who raised four kids alone in an era when single Black mothers were demonized as “welfare queens”; and a cast of family, friends, and neighbors who won small victories in a world built to swallow Black lives. With profound honesty and compassion, he raises questions that implicate us all: What does each person’s struggle to build a life teach us about what we owe each other? About what it means to be human? How Far to the Promised Land is a thrilling and tender epic about being Black in America. It’s a book that questions our too-simple narratives about poverty and upward mobility; a book in which the people normally written out of the American Dream are given voice.

Seams Deadly: Measure Twice Sewing Mystery by Maggie Blake Bailey, L'2017.

When sewist Lydia Barnes finds a dead body soon after moving to a new town, she will need more than shear luck to find the killer, in this novel perfect for fans of Molly MacRae and Anna Gerard. Lydia Barnes is excited for a fresh start when she moves to the quaint mountain town of Peridot, Georgia. Her friend, Fran, offers her a job at the Measure Twice fabric store and even sets her up on a date with the handsome Brandon Ivey, who also happens to be Lydia's new next-door neighbor. Finally, things are looking up. But after a disaster first date that ends with a fist bump instead of a kiss, Lydia doesn't think her night can get any worse. She's soon proven wrong when she later stumbles upon Brandon's dead body. Considered the prime suspect by the police, Lydia calls on her friends to help her hunt for the truth and prove her innocence. But when another body is soon found inside the Measure Twice store, Lydia knows that the killer must be close by, and that this town has more than its fair share of secrets. Who would want to frame the newest addition to Peridot for these terrible murders-and why? Lydia may discover that while sewing might have a pattern, killing rarely does. Will she be able to stitch together the clues and clear her own name before the killer strikes again?

Seams Deadly by Maggie Blake Bailey, L'2017.

When sewist Lydia Barnes finds a dead body soon after moving to a new town, she will need more than shear luck to find the killer, in this novel perfect for fans of Molly MacRae and Anna Gerard. Lydia Barnes is excited for a fresh start when she moves to the quaint mountain town of Peridot, Georgia. Her friend, Fran, offers her a job at the Measure Twice fabric store and even sets her up on a date with the handsome Brandon Ivey, who also happens to be Lydia's new next-door neighbor. Finally, things are looking up. But after a disaster first date that ends with a fist bump instead of a kiss, Lydia doesn't think her night can get any worse. She's soon proven wrong when she later stumbles upon Brandon's dead body. Considered the prime suspect by the police, Lydia calls on her friends to help her hunt for the truth and prove her innocence. But when another body is soon found inside the Measure Twice store, Lydia knows that the killer must be close by, and that this town has more than its fair share of secrets. Who would want to frame the newest addition to Peridot for these terrible murders--and why? Lydia may discover that while sewing might have a pattern, killing rarely does. Will she be able to stitch together the clues and clear her own name before the killer strikes again?

Seams Deadly: Measure Twice Sewing Mystery by Maggie Blake Bailey, L'2017.; Allyson Johnson(Read by).

In this cozy perfect for fans of Molly MacRae and Anna Gerard, sewist Lydia Barnes will need more than sheer luck after she finds the dead body of her new neighbor. Lydia Barnes is excited for a fresh start when she moves to the quaint mountain town of Peridot, Georgia. Her friend, Fran, offers her a job at the Measure Twice fabric store and even sets her up on a date with the handsome Brandon Ivey, who also happens to be Lydia's new next-door neighbor. Finally, things are looking up. But after a disaster first date that ends with a fist bump instead of a kiss, Lydia doesn't think her night can get any worse. She's soon proven wrong when she later stumbles upon Brandon's dead body. Considered the prime suspect by the police, Lydia calls on her friends to help her hunt for the truth and prove her innocence. But when another body is soon found inside the Measure Twice store, Lydia knows that the killer must be close by and that this town has more than its fair share of secrets. Who would want to frame the newest addition to Peridot for these terrible murders-and why? Lydia may discover that while sewing might have a pattern, killing rarely does. Will she be able to stitch together the clues and clear her own name before the killer strikes again? A cozy mystery series perfect for fans of Molly MacRae and Anna Gerard

Tell Me What I Am by Una Mannion, C'1987.

Two women wrenched apart by a family member's disappearance must find a way back to each other in this haunting page-turner by the author of A Crooked Tree. Nessa Garvey's sister Deena vanished without a trace in Philadelphia in 2004. In all that time, Nessa has never once doubted what her instincts told her: her sister's ex-husband has gotten away with an unspeakable crime. Nessa's niece, Ruby, is raised by her father, the man Nessa suspects, in rural Vermont, on the shores of Lake Champlain. Ruby learns how to hunt, how the plants and trees grow, how to avoid making her father angry. The one question she longs to ask is the one she knows she cannot voice: What really happened to her mother? Over fourteen years, four hundred miles apart, these two women slowly begin to unearth the family history of insidious power and control that has shaped them both in such different ways. But can they reach each other in time? Tell Me What I Am is a riveting, indelible tour de force of buried secrets and unlikely resilience.

Nature's Messenger by Patrick Dean, T'2006.

A dynamic and fresh exploration of the naturalist Mark Catesby--who predated John James Audubon by nearly a century-- and his influence on how we understand American wildlife. In 1722, Mark Catesby stepped ashore in Charles Town in the Carolina colony. Over the next four years, this young naturalist made history as he explored deep into America's natural wonders, collecting and drawing plants and animals which had never been seen back in the Old World. Nine years later Catesby produced his magnificent and groundbreaking book, The Natural History of Carolina, the first-ever illustrated account of American flora and fauna.  In Nature's Messenger, acclaimed writer Patrick Dean follows Catesby from his youth as a landed gentleman in rural England to his early work as a naturalist and his adventurous travels. A pioneer in many ways, Catesby's careful attention to the knowledge of non-Europeans in America--the enslaved Africans and Native Americans who had their own sources of food and medicine from nature--set him apart from others of his time.  Nature's Messenger takes us from the rice plantations of the Carolina Lowcountry to the bustling coffeehouses of 18th-century England, from the sun-drenched islands of the Bahamas to the austere meeting-rooms of London's Royal Society, then presided over by Isaac Newton. It was a time of discovery, of intellectual ferment, and of the rise of the British Empire. And there on history's leading edge, recording the extraordinary and often violent mingling of cultures as well as of nature, was Mark Catesby. Intensively researched and thrillingly told, Nature's Messenger will thrill fans of exploration and early American history as well as appealing to birdwatchers, botanists, and anyone fascinated by the natural world.

The Fence and the Wall by Jonathan Sturtevant Fletcher, C'1968.

This is the story of how the Christian creeds came to be, the controversies that formed their stimulus, and the lingering opportunities for misunderstanding that remain today.

Christian Insight and Wisdom of the Modern Age: The Complete Sermons of The Right Reverend George Lazenby Reynolds II by The Rt. Rev. George Lazenby Reynolds, C'1950, H'1986.

v. 1. The beginning years (1951-1957) -- v. 2. The early ministry (1957-1965) -- v. 3. The missionary years (1966-1971?) -- v. 4 (Building the Kingdom of God and a successful ministry career (1972-1976) -- v. 5 Building an iconic ministry by building the Kingdom of God (1977-1979) -- v. 6. A renowned reverend and columnist (1979-1991).

Wisdom of the North by Richard L. Harris, C'1961.

Wisdom of the North studies how and for what purposes proverbs were used by the composers of the sagas, thereby demonstrating how awareness of proverbial occurrences in these narratives can enable us to engage in more penetrating literary criticism of these works. The methods offered here have already been applied to the reading of other medieval texts, particularly those originating in societies marked by the presence or persistent influence of preliterate culture.

Christmas by Emily Hunter McGowin; Esau McCaulley, C'2002.(Editor)

"O wondrous exchange!" Of all the seasons of the church calendar, Christmas is the one most recognized and celebrated by our society at large. That means it's the season we're most familiar with--but that can also make it harder to see past Christmas's many cultural trappings to its timeless beauty. At the first Christmas, God exchanged the glories of divinity for the vulnerability of human existence, uniting himself to us in order to unite us to God. In this short volume, priest and theologian Emily Hunter McGowin invites us into the church's celebration of that great exchange, in all its theological and liturgical splendor. Each volume in the Fullness of Time series invites readers to engage with the riches of the church year, exploring the traditions, prayers, Scriptures, and rituals of the seasons of the church calendar.

Advent by Tish Harrison Warren; Esau McCaulley, C'2002.(Editor)

"Christians believe not just in one coming of Christ, but in three." We tend to think of Advent as the season of anticipation before Christmas--and while it is that, it's also much more. Throughout its history, the church has observed Advent as a preparation not only for the first coming of Christ in his incarnation but also for his second coming at the last day. It's also about a third coming: the coming of Christ to meet us in our present moment, to make us holy by his Word and Sacrament. In this short volume, priest and writer Tish Harrison Warren explores all three of these "comings" of Christ and invites us into a deeper experience of the first season of the Christian year. Each volume in the Fullness of Time series invites readers to engage with the riches of the church year, exploring how its traditions, prayers, Scriptures, and rituals all point us to Jesus.

Place of No Return by Mihrigul Tursun, Andrea C. Hoffmann; Rachel Hildebrandt Reynolds, C'1998.(Translator)

Her crime: she is Uyghur. Mihrigul Tursun's story is a powerful testimony of bravery in the face of unimaginable crimes. Her three children were forcibly taken from her before she was taken to a so-called re-education camp. Months later, she could only take two of her children back into her care alive. During her detention, Mihrigul Tursun was physically and mentally tortured and forcibly sterilized. She witnessed inmates being raped and killed. She was about to face her own execution when she was finally rescued. Mihrigul Tursun has experienced firsthand the measures used by the Chinese state to eradicate the cultural and religious identity of the Uyghurs. It is necessary to break people, cut off any closeness between them, find out every detail about them, frighten and terrorize them, not give them any freedom, or silence them. But even when Mihrigul Tursun is threatened, living in exile, and yet she is determined not to remain silent. It is her courageous concern to enlighten the world about the human rights violations against her people and report on the crimes behind the walls of the so-called re-education camps.

Place of No Return by Mihrigul Tursun, Andrea C. Hoffmann; Rachel Hildebrandt Reynolds, C'1998.(Translator)

Her crime: she is Uyghur. Mihrigul Tursun's story is a powerful testimony of bravery in the face of unimaginable crimes. Her three children were forcibly taken from her before she was taken to a so-called re-education camp. Months later, she could only take two of her children back into her care alive. During her detention, Mihrigul Tursun was physically and mentally tortured and forcibly sterilized. She witnessed inmates being raped and killed. She was about to face her own execution when she was finally rescued. Mihrigul Tursun has experienced firsthand the measures used by the Chinese state to eradicate the cultural and religious identity of the Uyghurs. It is necessary to break people, cut off any closeness between them, find out every detail about them, frighten and terrorize them, not give them any freedom, or silence them. But even when Mihrigul Tursun is threatened, living in exile, and yet she is determined not to remain silent. It is her courageous concern to enlighten the world about the human rights violations against her people and report on the crimes behind the walls of the so-called re-education camps.

A Word on Words: the best of John Seigenthaler's, H'2007 interviews by Pat Toomay; Frye Gaillard; Nikki Giovanni, H'2022.(Contribution by); Jon Meacham, C'1991, H'2010. (Contribution by)

For years the legendary John Seigenthaler hosted A Word on Words on Nashville's public television station, WNPT. During the show's four-decade run (1972 to 2013), he interviewed some of the most interesting and most impor­tant writers of our time. These in-depth exchanges revealed much about the writers who appeared on his show and gave a glimpse into their creative pro­cesses. Seigenthaler was a deeply engaged reader and a generous interviewer, a true craftsman. Frye Gaillard and Pat Toomay have collected and transcribed some of the iconic interactions from the show.
Featuring interviews with: Arna Bontemps * Marshall Chapman * Pat Conroy * Rodney Crowell * John Egerton * Jesse Hill Ford * Charles Fountain * William Price Fox * Kinky Friedman * Frye Gaillard * Nikki Giovanni, H'2022. * Doris Kearns Goodwin * David Halberstam * Waylon Jennings * John Lewis * David Maraniss * William Marshall * Jon Meacham, C'1991, H'2010. * Ann Patchett * Alice Randall * Dori Sanders * John Seigenthaler Sr. * Marty Stuart * Pat Toomay

Birding Sewanee by Richard Candler and Angus Pritchard, C'2022. Eric Ezell, C'2008.(illustrator)

The book details some the best birding spots on and off the mountain, and provides tips on where and when to find the roughly 250 species that occur in the Sewanee area. It also provides information about how to get started birding.

Un-Sprung: poems by Mandy Moe Pwint Tu, C'2021.

Unsprung: In a book of witness, indictment, rage, heartache, and grief, Burmese writer M. Tu explores poetic form, like a compass swinging wildly toward north, as a means of examining the indefensible political violence in her home country of Myanmar.

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Star trek. Strange new worlds. Season one by Anson Mount, C'1995.(Actor)

Season One is based on the years Captain Christopher Pike manned the helm of the U.S.S. Enterprise. The series features fan favorites from Season Two of STAR TREK: DISCOVERY: Anson Mount as Captain Christopher Pike, Rebecca Romijn as Number One, and Ethan Peck as Science Officer Spock. The series follows Captain Pike and the crew in the decade before Captain Kirk boarded the U.S.S. Enterprise, as they explore new worlds around the galaxy.

A Most Tolerant Little Town by Rachel Louise Martin, School of Letters.

* A New York Times Nonfiction Book to Read This Summer * An Atlanta Journal Constitution Southern Book to Read this Summer * A BookPage Most Anticipated Book of 2023 * An intimate portrait of a small town living through tumultuous times, this propulsive piece of forgotten civil rights history--about the first school to attempt court-ordered desegregation in the wake of Brown v. Board--will forever change how you think of the end of racial segregation in America. In graduate school, Rachel Martin volunteered with a Southern oral history project. One day, she was sent to a small town in Tennessee, in the foothills of the Appalachians, where locals wanted to build a museum to commemorate the events of September 1956, when Clinton High School became the first school in the former Confederacy to undergo court-mandated desegregation. But not everyone wanted to talk. As one founder of the Tennessee White Youth told her, "Honey, there was a lot of ugliness down at the school that year; best we just move on and forget it." For years, Martin wondered what it was some white residents of Clinton didn't want remembered. So she went back, eventually interviewing over sixty townsfolk--including nearly a dozen of the first students to desegregate Clinton High--to piece together what happened back in 1956: the death threats and beatings, picket lines and cross burnings, neighbors turned on neighbors and preachers for the first time at a loss for words. The national guard rushed to town, along with national journalists like Edward Morrow and even evangelist Billy Graham. But that wasn't the most explosive secret Martin learned.... In A Most Tolerant Little Town, Rachel Martin weaves together over a dozen perspectives in a kaleidoscopic portrait of a small town living through a tumultuous turning point for America. The result is a spellbinding mystery, a riveting piece of forgotten civil rights history, and a poignant reminder of the toll on those who stand on the frontlines of social change. You may never before have heard of Clinton, Tennessee--but you won't be forgetting the town anytime soon.

Toward a Holy Ecology by Rabbi Ellen Bernstein, Foreword by Bill McKibben H'2012.

"Reading Ellen Bernstein's Toward a Holy Ecology is to partake in a garden of delights. She refreshes our reading of the Song by enlivening all of our senses." --Rabbi Nancy Flam, Co-founder National Center for Jewish Healing, and The Institute for Jewish Spirituality Song of Songs is known as the erotic part of the Bible, but Ellen Bernstein shows how it is also an ancient source of deep ecological wisdom. Toward a Holy Ecology is a new translation of this Hebrew text, illuminating the place of humans in the natural world and inviting you to develop a holy, ecological language for life. This book sets the natural world before you with intensity and beauty, inviting you to savor it with all your senses. Then you are able to return to the world with a renewed clarity, love, and energy necessary for creating a healthier future for the earth and all her inhabitants. Toward a Holy Ecology is for all who love the earth and its inhabitants--including outdoor enthusiasts, spiritual seekers, fellow poets, feminists, and students of the humanities, religion, and ecology. It will change how you see, how you speak, and how you live.

It's Not about You by Elizabeth P. Beasley, T'2004.

"It's Not About You: Paradoxes of Christian Leadership presents a basic paradox in ministry: The purpose of ministry is to point attention to God, but much of contemporary ministry points attention back to the clergy, and the primary tool that ministers have is who they are. One can easily get the sense "It's all about you." In the face of this paradox, and given the lack of structure in ministry, Christian leaders need a rule of life in order to be faithful to the promises they have made and keep their attention on God and the people among whom they serve. Through exercises and reflection questions, this book guides clergy, those preparing for ordination, and other Christian leaders in composing a rule of life so as to navigate the demands of ministry. The book is also useful for those who wish to understand the way of life necessary for leadership in the church."--Amazon.

The House of Being by Natasha D. Trethewey, H'2023.

An exquisite meditation on the geographies we inherit and the metaphors we inhabit, from Pulitzer Prize winner and nineteenth U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey In a shotgun house in Gulfport, Mississippi, at the crossroads of Highway 49, the legendary highway of the Blues, and Jefferson Street, Natasha Trethewey learned to read and write. Before the land was a crossroads, however, it was a pasture: a farming settlement where, after the Civil War, a group of formerly enslaved women, men, and children made a new home. In this intimate and searching meditation, Trethewey revisits the geography of her childhood to trace the origins of her writing life, born of the need to create new metaphors to inhabit "so that my story would not be determined for me." She recalls the markers of history and culture that dotted the horizons of her youth: the Confederate flags proudly flown throughout Mississippi; her gradual understanding of her own identity as the child of a Black mother and a white father; and her grandmother's collages lining the hallway, offering glimpses of the world as it could be. With the clarity of a prophet and the grace of a poet, Trethewey offers up a vision of writing as reclamation: of our own lives and the stories of the vanished, forgotten, and erased.

The Interior Castle by Laurel Mathewson, T'2013.

Teresa of Avila was a sixteenth-century Carmelite nun who was committed to a life of contemplative prayer. Beloved for both her deep spiritual insights and practical approach to life, her writings are considered spiritual classics, and The Interior Castle is widely recognized as her literary masterpiece. To read The Interior Castle is to put yourself in the hands of an extraordinarily qualified faith mentor who well understands our struggles to connect with God. Teresa's primary metaphor throughout this work is that the human soul is an "interior castle," or a series of "dwelling places," of great grandeur, beauty, and value. Her book is a tour of the different ways we relate to God through prayer, with varying intensity, awareness, and intimacy, culminating with spiritual unity with God. Many books on prayer are about what we do to pray, or to pray better. But there are relatively few, like The Interior Castle, that focus on what God does in prayer--particularly the sometimes inexplicable ways God gives us experiences of love, healing, strength, insight, companionship, and knowledge of God's presence in, and will for, our lives. In this new edition of The Interior Castle, editor Laurel Mathewson, author of An Intimate Good: A Skeptical Christian Mystic in Conversation with Teresa of Avila, brings this renowned spiritual leader into clear focus for contemporary readers. This edition features a modernized text with an introduction to St. Teresa and her work, brief chapter summaries, helpful footnotes for additional information and clarity, and questions for personal reflection. Mathewson encourages us to be open to the ways in which Teresa's "experiences and writings still shed light on things that happen in our world, so different from hers in many ways but still filled with human beings struggling to be in relationship with one another and God."

The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Catholicism by Frederick C. Bauerschmidt, C'1984.

Provides a broad and deep survey of Roman Catholic life and thought, updated and expanded throughout The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Catholicism provides an authoritative overview of the history, doctrine, practices, and expansion of Catholicism. Written by a group of distinguished scholars, this comprehensive reference work offers an illuminating account of the global, historical, and cultural phenomena of Catholicism. Accessible chapters address central topics in the practice of Catholic theology and the development of doctrine, including God and Jesus Christ, creation and Church, the Virgin Mary, the sacraments, moral theology, eschatology, and more. Throughout the text, the authors illustrate the unity and diversity of Catholic life and thought while highlighting the ways Catholicism overlaps with, and transforms, other ways of living and thinking. Now in its second edition, The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Catholicism is fully updated to include recent developments in the study of Catholicism. Extensively revised and expanded chapters, many of which written by new authors, address contemporary issues such as theology and politics, environmentalism, and the clerical sexual abuse crisis. Entirely new chapters cover the early modern Church, the Bible in Catholic theology, the Eastern Catholic churches, liturgy, care for creation, the consecrated life, challenges for the Catholic Church, and more. An informed and engaging intellectual journey through the past and present of Roman Catholicism, The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Catholicism: Illustrates the diversity of modern Catholic life and thought Describes Catholics in different lands, including the Holy Land, India, Africa, Europe, the British Isles, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas Surveys spirituality and ecumenism, inter-religious dialog, Catholic schools and hospitals, art and the sciences, the Holy See, and other central Catholic institutions and practices Covers major eras in Catholic history, from the Scriptures and the early Church to Post-Modernity Features new material on diverse practices of Catholicism across cultures, the global dimensions of the Catholic Church, race and ethnicity, and Eastern Catholic Churches The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Catholicism, Second Edition, is the ideal textbook for surveys classes on Catholicism and Catholic theology in Catholic, Protestant, and non-confessional colleges and universities. It is also an invaluable resource for scholars and general readers interested in broadening their knowledge of Catholicism.

The inclusion of these publications on this page is not an endorsement of the contents or values expressed in the materials. The book descriptions have been provided by the publishers and should not be considered a review of the book.